Review: 보트 / ノーボーイズ、ノークライ(Bo-teu/Boat aka No Boys, No Cry)

2 thoughts on “Review: 보트 / ノーボーイズ、ノークライ(Bo-teu/Boat aka No Boys, No Cry)”

  1. Ack, what to do? I like the way you reviewed it, but don’t feel gutsy enough to watch this kind of movies.
    So, they went with the personification of the Japan Man and the Korean Man. If only there would be no bloody fight, I’d watch it just for the human and intercultural interactions.
    Ah, you said it: Tsumabuki really is versatile, and has so many various facial expressions…His more recent movie “Ai to Makoto” features him as a high school delinquent (I almost didn’t recognize him at first). It totally looks like the typical wacky film only Japanese are able to pull out. Even Tsumabuki had a hard time defining it:
    http://www.tokyohive.com/2012/04/tsumabuki-satoshi-tries-to-describe-his-upcoming-movie-ai-to-makoto-again/

    1. I have a lot of love for this movie. The film is certainly billed as something with bloody fights and stuff (not my thing either – although I will put with it if I think the film merits it for a particular reason) but it was really about the relationship between the two guys, which, for me, was very touching.
      There is definitely also the J-Man/K-Man thing, but, again, that is something that is overcome in the relationship between the two boys.
      I have actually heard of Ai to Makoto (featured it in a Trailer Weekly I think?) – it looks almost too strange to me, but the fact that Tsumabuki is in it and that it also screened at Cannes makes me want to watch it. I’m confident it will pop up on some London festival programme – maybe even the BFI Film Festival (the biggest one we’ve got).

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